8507 DIE DORNIER-POST No. 7-1936 Oktober/November

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8507 DIE DORNIER-POST No. 7-1936 Oktober/November - aircraft/ aviation magazines of the German company DORNIER, airplanes, engeneering, news etc. condition: very good to good

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Dornier Flugzeugwerke was a German aircraft manufacturer founded in Friedrichshafen in 1914 by Claude Dornier. Over the course of its long lifespan, the company produced many designs for both the civil and military markets.

In Oktober/November 1935 the company published its own magazine.

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Dornier's most significant military aircraft design before and during World War II was the Do 17, nicknamed The Flying Pencil. It was developed and first flown in 1934 as a commercial aircraft in competition for a Lufthansa contract. Due to its narrow fuselage (hence its nickname) it was not commercially attractive and was passed over by Lufthansa. Dornier then further developed it as a military aircraft with a prototype bomber first flying in 1935. In 1937, it was employed in pro-Fascist terror bombings by the German Condor Legion during the Spanish Civil War. Production continued within Germany and this versatile two-engined aircraft was developed by the Luftwaffe into multiple combat variations.

The medium bomber variant saw much service during the early part of World War II including extensive use in the Battle of Britain. It was later developed into an effective nightfighter to defend Germany from the RAF bomber offensive. Dornier developed the successful Do 217 based on the Do 17; ostensibly looking like its younger sibling, this larger and much heavier bomber was in fact a completely new design. Dornier also developed the fastest piston-engined fighter of the war, the two-engined Do 335, introduced too late to enter combat service.

Dornier's history of successful flying boats (the "Wal" family) lead to new models that saw service in several armed forces around the world as well as Germany, including the Do 22, Do 18, and Do 24.